sun and sand in puerto viejo

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First off, we wish everyone a very happy, healthy, and an abundant new year!

We have only a few more days to enjoy this lovely, warm and welcoming part of Costa Rica: the Caribbean village of Puerto Viejo. We have really enjoyed the sunshine and the sandy beach, and even though it is technically the rainy season, about 75% of our days have been without rain, or so little rain that we could still spend several hours on the beach each day.

Our vacation rental, Casa Amarilla (Yellow House), is the closet we have stayed to our beloved Cocles Beach. In fact we are an easy 100 metres to the beach.

One of the most disturbing changes we found in Puerto Viejo was that our beach has virtually disappeared. During our past two stays here, October 2012 and late October 2014, we would walk through the jungle, arrive at the entrance to the beach and walk about 50 metres to the right and 100 metres out toward the ocean and put down our blankets. Not this time.

On our first day here, the beach was about 20 metres wide but as high tide approached, the beach did not exist at all.

We talked to a gentleman who has been here every year and he said “have you heard of climate change?”

Of course we have. There was a news report that the area around the North Pole has less ice than previous years, only 80% of the water has frozen as opposed to 90% in past years. The ocean is obviously getting warmer and this is making waves in other parts of the globe, including here. Close to town, some businesses have piled up sandbags to keep the ocean from washing away their beachfront. In other places, we could see that the ground under the trees close to the beach was being washed away by the waves and higher tides and the sand itself was disappearing. We know other beaches around the world are facing similar challenges.

In spite of the high waters, we have enjoyed playing in the water and lying on the beach.

One of our favourite eateries has been the Lazy Mon. It is a hostel with a bar and restaurant in an open area facing the beach. Every night at 5 pm they have musicians entertain their guests. The best performance this visit has been an American musician, Lester Seal from Virginia. He has an incredible voice and a great stage presence.  From lounge lizard music to Jimmy Hendrix, he really holds the crowd!

We walk an average of 6 kms a day and are feeling really good. We expect to walk along the beach and through the jungle to Playa Uva today, about 8 kms south of here. We love to walk along the beach, especially when the water is so warm compared to Vancouver.

Enjoy all the photos Don is posting with this blog… most in the vicinity of Casa Amarilla and Playa Cocles.

So, our dear friends and followers, have a lovely second week of January! Here’s to lots of love, happiness and great health to you!

Deborah

7 things we love about Puerto Viejo

As 2014 comes to a close we want to share with you what we love about Puerto Viejo. We first enjoyed the charms of this laid-back, off-the-beaten-track Caribbean gem during our travels throughout Central and South America in 2012. At the time we knew we would return, and from the last couple of posts, you know we did — for three glorious weeks. So here they are, the 7 things we love about Puerto Viejo:

1. Wide sandy beaches
There are about 15 kms of beach from the town of Puerto Viejo to the village of Manzanillo to the south. You can walk from one end to the other with your toes in the sand about 80 percent of the way, just a few diversions around uprooted coral reefs and rocky points. Some sections are quite narrow, but there are numerous 2 and 3 km stretches of wide sandy beaches — we were staying just 100m from our favourite, Playa Cocles.
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2. Warm and clean water
Did we mention this is the Caribbean? If you have visited Cancun or Belize, or any of a number of islands located in the Caribbean Sea (like Cuba for example) you know how warm the water is, and in the case of this stretch of beach, clean and almost completely free of the trash that plagues many beaches around the world.
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3. 850 species of birds
Our last two posts probably tell you everything you need a bird watching in PV. So we’ve dropped in a photo of a Resplendent Quetzal about to eat a wild avocado, taken in the cloud forest just a few hours away.
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4. Lazy Mon bar and restaurant
This visit and last, our “home away from home away from home” was the Lazy Mon. At least 3 or 4 times a week we would walk into town from Playa Cocles to get a few groceries and other supplies, and drop by the Lazy Mon. On the beach itself at the edge of town and popular with locals, tourists, families, and Rastafarians, not to mention up to about a dozen laid-back dogs, it also features live music every night, mostly bands of expat musicians keeping themselves and the beat alive.
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5. Expat musicians
Speaking of expat musicians, out favourite group in PV is Tracy and the Two Davids, regulars at La Biela Sabores del Mundo restaurant and bar. Tracy has an incredible vocal range, David One on guitar is extremely accomplished, and David Two knows his way about a bass.
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6. Safe at night
Many tourist areas around the Caribbean are unsafe at night, hence the high barbed wire-tipped fences and armed guards that surround many resorts. Not so in PV. Yes there are a few low-key resorts, but most of the accommodation is in two categories: hostels and vacation house rentals. Almost everyone night we walked either 3 kms north into town, or 2 kms south to La Biela — and no matter how late we returned we did not feel unsafe, other than from cars speeding by too quickly in the dark or swerving to avoid potholes (the only north-south road is paved but not well maintained).
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7. Laid back vibe
Although it’s only a few hours by car or bus from the capital, PV has not experienced the same tourism-fueled development that one finds on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. It continues to attract young backpackers and old expats alike from Europe, Australia, Canada and the US anxious to mix with sandy beaches, warm water, and displaced Rastafarians from throughout the Caribbean. There is an abundance of wildlife, a coral reef, and an annual chocolate festival that celebrates the local organic cacao harvest.
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Did we miss something you love about Puerto Viejo? Let us know!

 

 

like living in a bird sanctuary

It’s as if our cabin is located in a bird sanctuary. No sooner did we publish a post describing the fascinating range of birds we’re seeing on the ground or in the trees around our cabin, but some new ones drop by for a visit.

First sight out the window yesterday morning was this female Slaty-tailed Trogan.

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Later we were returning from a day at the beach to be greeted by this Keel-billed Toucan in the cherry tree beside our cabin.

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The Toucan grabbed a cherry and flew to a tree on the other side of the cabin, and what should we see but a group of Montezuma Oropendolas, mostly high in the tree and quite hidden, but this one popped down to a lower branch for just a moment.

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No doubt as soon as we click on “publish” another interesting and colourful bird will land in our yard asking for equal blog time!

costa rica is for the birds

This one is for the bird lovers among our kind readers.

Costa Rica is home to more than 840 species of birds. It is a favourite destination for amateur and dedicated bird watchers alike. In fact, it’s hard to ignore the birds here, whether it’s the ominous circling of black vultures overhead, the screeching of wood rails, the raspy call of toucans, the rapid buzzing past of hummingbirds, or the happy chirpiness of great kiskadees, we are surrounded!

The travel companies here on the Caribbean coast offer bird watching tours, and we may do one yet. In the meantime, the grounds, creek, and trees around the cabin we’re staying at near Playa Cocles, (about three kilometres south of Puerto Viejo), are all we need — most of the photos below were shot from the open main floor of our cabin or within metres of our front steps. Many of the rest were taken at the beach 100m away, or on a nearby trail. And these are just the ones we could see and grab photos of. We could hear many others, but could not see them high in the trees or well-hidden by leaves and branches, or I didn’t have my camera with me or get it out in time.

One tree on the property in particular is a gold-mine for up-close bird watching. In some of the photos you’ll see birds with the red-berry from this tall shrub — I believe they are Surinam Cherries.

We’ve done our best to identify the birds in these photos from a two-page field guide and some good websites — but some remain unknown. Help with additional names, or corrections, is very welcome! You should be able to click on each photo to see a larger version.

Rufus-tailed Hummingbird

Rufus-tailed Hummingbird

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Great Kiskadee

Great Kiskadee

Passerini's Tanager

Passerini’s Tanager

Chestnut-mandibled Toucan

Chestnut-mandibled Toucan

Olive-backed Euphonia

Olive-backed Euphonia

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Blue-black Grassquit

Blue-black Grassquit

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Squirrel Cuckoo

Squirrel Cuckoo

Long-tailed Hermit

Long-tailed Hermit

Streaked-headed Woodcreeper

Streaked-headed Woodcreeper

Green Kingfisher

Green Kingfisher

Collared Aracari

Collared Aracari

Collared Aracari

Collared Aracari

Snowy Egret

Snowy Egret

Broad-winged Hawk

Broad-winged Hawk

Collared Aracari

Collared Aracari

Whimbrel

Whimbrel

Squirrel Cuckoo

Squirrel Cuckoo

Ringed Kingfisher

Ringed Kingfisher

Grey-necked Wood Rail

Grey-necked Wood Rail

Chestnut-mandibled Toucan

Chestnut-mandibled Toucan

Great Kiskadee

Great Kiskadee

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Groove-billed Ani

Groove-billed Ani

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return to the caribbean coast

Hello from our cozy nest in Costa Rica.

We left our apartment building in Vancouver on the 19th of October and immediately broke into a run to catch an approaching bus. This brought back numerous memories of frantically running to catch buses, trains, and boats over the past five years of travel. We laughed, not quite believing this start to our vacation.

Our departure from the Vancouver airport was uneventful… through check in, through security. We walked around a bit and then settled by our departure gate. Then our names were called to go to the departure counter. They wanted to know where we were going, as we were travelling through the U.S., stopping only to transfer planes. We had already explained this to the USA immigration. All was good.

We then landed in Los Angeles airport. We found our waiting area, but it was over full, so we sat in the next waiting area. Looking around the departure area, it was a total opposite of our Vancouver airport. Not one bit of art, no colour on the walls, floors or anywhere. There was no coffee shop, restaurant or bar. We’ve been to better decorated and equipped airports in even the smallest and poorest of countries.

People were waiting for planes to Guatemala and El Salvador in our sections. Our next connection was to San Salvador, so we patiently sat making observations. We noticed there were a lot of elderly people waiting as well. Not only were they sitting in regular seats, standing or leaning against walls, they were sitting in wheel chairs. We had never seen so many wheelchairs lined up for one flight. There must have been at least 40 people waiting in these very basic wheelchairs. What we then realized was that the people in wheelchairs and their entire families are boarded first – maybe that explains the demand for wheelchair access.

Announcements were made in Spanish first and then English. We were watching, observing and then over the public address system, we heard both our names. We worked our way up to the departure desk… we heard our names one more time as we walked. We looked at each other… what the heck? The attendant was quite brisk with us… she took our passports, quizzed us on where we were going and demanded we produce our itinerary. We told her we had explained where we were going to US immigration. She had a strong Spanish accent, so was hard to understand. Again she demanded a written itinerary, otherwise she wouldn’t let us board. Don fortunately had this in our backpack… again all was good and we had our passports back. Yeah! It was obvious to us at that point, that none of the points of contact along the way were communicating or even had our flight itinerary, even though it was booked all at once through Air Canada. This has been the first time we have been questioned so many times in one trip.

When we arrived in San Jose, Costa Rica we stayed at the Marriot, which is the closest hotel to the airport. It was a great room and we did some food shopping at the cavernous Walmart, which was next door. We finally arrived in Puerto Viejo by bus the next day. It felt like coming home… not much has changed… and that is a good thing. More from this Caribbean outpost in a few days!

On route

On route

View of Puerto Viejo from Playa Negra, just north of town

View of Puerto Viejo from Playa Negra, just north of town

Our open floor cabin, bedroom upstairs and lots of wildlife all around

Our open floor cabin, bedroom upstairs and lots of wildlife all around

Here we are at Playa Cocles, 100 metres from our cabin

Here we are at Playa Cocles, 100 metres from our cabin

Our favourite seaside bar in Puerto Viejo is alive and well, ex-pat bands perform almost every night

Our favourite seaside bar in Puerto Viejo is alive and well, ex-pat bands perform almost every night

Howler monkeys wake up and howl at 5:30 every morning, sounds like a T Rex is approaching!

Howler monkeys wake up and howl at 5:30 every morning, sounds like a T Rex is approaching!

Grey-necked Wood Rail, clucks like a chicken, occasional screech would wake the dead!

Grey-necked Wood Rail, clucks like a chicken, occasional screech would wake the dead!

liveable loveable cities south of the rio grande

What makes a city liveable and loveable? This is the question Monocle magazine poses through its annual “quality of life” survey of cities around the world. Monocle describes itself as “a briefing on global affairs, business, culture & design” but the articles and ads are clearly aimed at a wealthy demographic with an interest in travel. Someone left one at our hostel in Panama City, and I’m leaving it in Costa Rica for the next traveller who passes this way.

The authors look at a variety of factors that contribute to city life: building and urban design, infrastructure, tolerance, opening hours, outdoor/green space, weather, international flights and how seamless the connections are for getting across or into/out of town, and even how many electric car charging points are located within city limits. The cities are then ranked; 25 make the main list, there are another five cities to watch that are “close to the editors’ hearts” and then a final five that warrant a “special mention” because they offer “simple living”. Vancouver checked in at number 20, up a spot from the 2011 survey (but down from 2010 when it was 16th).

Regular readers will know that over the past ten months we have sampled life in dozens of cities south of the Rio Grande; it breaks our heart to see that none made the top 25. Havana, which we’re on our way to later this week (and have visited in the past), did make it onto the cities to watch list, and Valparaiso deservedly earned a special mention – consolation prizes, yes, but maybe it will encourage their politicians and planners to try a little harder.

So Deborah and I have come up with our own list of five “liveable and loveable cities,” as we continue our live on the road.

1. Valparaiso – we agree with Monocle that this old port city has a lot of offer – ancient fish markets, old-school bars, fascinating hill-top neighbourhoods each with a different character, Pablo Neruda’s eclectic ocean view house La Sebastiana, numerous cultural facilities including a prison now cultural centre, and art-covered walls, houses, and schools. To make the top 25, Valparaiso will have to do something about the 80,000 stray dogs that are wandering the street. Sure, many are friendly or don’t pay passersby any mind, but many are visibly wretched and diseased, and more than a few are just plain angry and dangerous. Not to mention the amount of poop they are generate. The city also needs to fix the funiculars – the hillside escalators, some dating back to the 1890s, which make visiting the hills a much more exciting adventure than catching a cab. Two-thirds are closed or waiting repair, leaving only a handful serving the most touristic neighbourhoods.

2. Buenos Aires –the Monocle list is very Eurocentric – 11 of the 25 cities are within the European Union, so maybe there was simply no room for a new world city that at one time was 60 percent Italian. Just the same, it’s worth a second look with all its museums, art galleries, park spaces, murals, fascinating neighbourhoods, and an efficient although hot and crowded subway system (the first line dates from 1913 and features the original wooden rail cars). We also appreciate that there has been much effort to help citizens and visitors learn about human rights violations committed during the military dictatorship, through art exhibitions and turning former sites of detention into places for reflection and action. They just need to do something about garbage collection (every street corner is piled with garbage for days before pick-up) and all the old cars simply abandoned at street corners all over town.

3. Rio de Janeiro — it surprises us that the largest city in South America didn’t make the Monocle list – maybe the fact that a huge percentage of the city’s population continues to live with poverty, many in drug-lord controlled favelas, holds it back. It has lots of offer – and after all it is hosting the FIFA World Cup in 2014 and the Summer Olympics in 2016, and there has been a concerted effort to kick out the drug lords with mixed results. The bus and subway system was easy to use and moved us quickly from unique area to unique area, and to and from a wide variety of art galleries and cultural spaces. And surely, Copacabana, the best beach in South America has to count for something!

4. Antigua – Guatemala is not without challenges, but tucked away in a low valley between volcanos is this earthquake decimated 400-year-old city. Once important for geo-political reasons, it is now a refuge for American ex-pats and peace corp do-gooders, a centre for Spanish language schools, and an escape from the country’s notoriously dangerous capital, none of which takes away from its charm. The cobblestone streets are labelled, a rarity in Latin America, and there are ancient ruins around every corner. There are also lots of services for tourists, our favourites included several rooftop bars that offered a view of distant but fiery lava flows that glow in the dark.

5. Puerto Viejo – admittedly, a town this small on the south Caribbean coast of Costa Rica would never make the Monocle list, but ”liveable and loveable” applies even if there is no nearby international airport, famous-architect-designed art galleries or opera houses, or places to plug in an electric car. Unpretentious, undeniably humid, and laid-back, Puerto Viejo and the beaches south of town, in many ways, offers the perfect antidote to the fast-paced pressure cookers that did make the Monocle list. Sure, there is only one paved road, there are bugs, and the water cuts out without notice, but what the heck, dos mojitos por favor!

On the subject of happy hour, we’ve had more family visitors over the past two weeks: Chris and Tiffany, and Jeremy and Jenine – it was a pleasure to share our jungle/beach house with them, and give them a small taste of life on the road, photos below.

dolphins love bob

We have just spent a great week with Melanie (youngest daughter) here in Puerto Viejo. The weather was really quite good. It is transition season here on the Caribbean, which means it is wonderfully sunny for a few days and then a few days with periods of rain… much different from the highlands of Panama which has an average of 5,000 ml of rain every year, more than four times the rainfall on the coast.

Puerto Viejo is just like the tour books say. It is really a laid back, party town with several kilometres of sandy beaches. We were told electricity arrived here in 1996 and the road down the coast paved for the first time in 2001.

The house we have rented in 3 kms south of town and though we are in the jungle, it feels a bit like a suburb. There are quite a few B&B’s and houses for rent and we have close neighbours all around. We can’t really see them too well but we can hear them. There is a little girl that has a wonderful laugh and seems very happy… I enjoy listening to her.

Our local beach, Cocles, is a ten minute walk from the house. It begins about one kilometre this side of town and even though there are some people here and there on the beach, it is like having your own piece of surf and sand. The majority of folks on Cocles are at the north end where they do surfing. Our spot is about 1.5 km from the beginning of the beach. It is a pleasure that people are not packed, person to person, like in Rio at Copacabana Beach.

The temperature of the water is marvelous. It is cool enough to be refreshing and warm enough to play in. We spend anywhere from one hour to three hours a day in the water… just floating or riding waves with boogie boards. Mel had never boogie boarded before, but soon she was catching the waves and swishing towards shore…. it is a lot of fun.

We booked a four-hour tour to snorkel and see dolphins with Wahoo Fishing Tours. Janet, the owner and Pino, our captain were wonderful! When we got on board, they had the theme from Gilligan’s Island playing. It started to rain shortly after we left Puerto Viejo, but we had our thin plastic raingear with us and our swimsuits on… which was good, as we got soaking wet.

We arrived at the area where Pino was expecting the dolphins to appear…. nothing for a few minutes and then Janet put on Bob Marley music and just like magic, the dolphins arrived to swim and jump around us. As you will see when you watch the video Don took, that we were having a ball watching these wonderful creatures. There seemed to be two groups of about 6 or 8 dolphins (bottle nosed and Atlantic) and they loved playing around the boat. I am not sure how much time we were watching them, but every moment seemed very special. The dolphins even followed us for a bit when we were leaving the area to go snorkelling.

The sky cleared and the snorkelling was amazing! We jumped from the boat and swam close to a large rock outcropping. We saw red fish, blue fish, striped fish, spotted fish and much more… from very tiny to about 15 to 18 inches long. I also saw a very thick star fish and of course lots of coral. Don made use of his new underwater camera.

While we were enjoying the underwater scenery, Pino was catching lobsters, shellfish (large oysters) and even caught a very large crab (crabs are not common to the area).  They also fished from the boat as we were moving from place to place and caught a tuna and a kingfish. They sell these from the beach after returning, every afternoon. Pino knows his stuff and loves to fish.

We had a marvelous time as the four hour tour turned into a seven hour day. Thanks to you both, Janet and Pino.

One of the major industries in this part of the world is chocolate. You can do tours of chocolate farms, but as Mel and I aren’t supposed to eat chocolate, we decided to do a spa instead. We had a wonderful time at the Pure Jungle Spa the other day. They treated us so well from the moment we arrived. They gave us some very good juice that was all natural… it was brown and tasted slightly sweet. We had a foot soak with lemongrass… pure heaven. We then had a massage. Mel had a gentle one with Roxanna and I had a heavier duty massage with Margaret. One more step in heaven. Though we don’t eat chocolate, doesn’t mean we can’t have a chocolate rub…. it was marvelous! Our skin glowed and smelled wonderful. After our hour was up we enjoyed cool cucumber water, and caught a taxi home instead of walking the 3 km… we thought maybe the mosquitoes would really like us as we felt like chocolate bars.

Sadly, Mel’s time with us was up and we caught the bus with her to San Jose and sent her on her way back to Vancouver and the cooler climate. I must say that arriving back in Puerto Viejo was just like coming home…. I do love it here!

Lots of happiness to you all and much love sent your way!

Deborah

Dolphin video clip: